The man who mistook his wife for a hat

Since the seventies, Sacks has written books on a large number of medical topics, including MigraineAn Anthropologist on MarsHallucinationsand two memoirs—Uncle Tungsten and On the Move Sacks was known for being a brilliant but often painfully shy man.

The man who mistook his wife for a hat

It was here, in relation to his students, that certain strange problems were first observed. Sometimes a student would present himself, and Dr P. The moment the student spoke, he would be recognised by his voice. Such incidents multiplied, causing embarrassment, perplexity, fear—and, sometimes, comedy.

For not only did Dr P.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

At first these odd mistakes were laughed off as jokes, not least by Dr P. Had he not always had a quirky sense of humour and been given to Zen-like paradoxes and jests?

His musical powers were as dazzling as ever; he did not feel ill—he had never felt better; and the mistakes were so ludicrous—and so ingenious—that they could hardly be serious or betoken anything serious.

Well aware that diabetes could affect his eyes, Dr P. It was obvious within a few seconds of meeting him that there was no trace of dementia in the ordinary sense. He was a man of great cultivation and charm who talked well and fluently, with imagination and humour.

And yet there was something a bit odd. He faced me as he spoke, was oriented towards me, and yet there was something the matter—it was difficult to formulate. He faced me with his ears, I came to think, but not with his eyes. I am not sure that I fully realised this at the time—there was just a teasing strangeness, some failure in the normal interplay of gaze and expression.

He saw me, he scanned me, and yet. When I came back, Dr P.

The man who mistook his wife for a hat

How can there be anything seriously the matter? Would he permit me to examine him?

The man who mistook his wife for a hat

It was while examining his reflexes—a trifle abnormal on the left side—that the first bizarre experience occurred. I had taken off his left shoe and scratched the sole of his foot with a key—a frivolous-seeming but essential test of a reflex—and then, excusing myself to screw my ophthalmoscope together, left him to put on the shoe himself.

To my surprise, a minute later, he had not done this. Finally his gaze settled on his foot: That is your foot. There is your shoe. I thought that was my foot. I helped him on with his shoe his footto avoid further complication. I resumed my examination.

His visual acuity was good: He saw all right, but what did he see? I opened out a copy of the National Geographic Magazine and asked him to describe some pictures in it. His responses here were very curious.Jun 05,  · The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat 1h 15min | Drama, Musical | TV Movie 5 June Opera singer and professor Dr P is examined both in a clinic and in his home, as he suffers from a degeneration of the occipital lobe that allows him to see details, but not wholes/10(30).

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Sacks, Oli · Hardcover out of 5 stars - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Sacks, Oli.

Sacks was an erudite, well-read man, and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat alludes to many masterpieces of Western literature, often as a way of clarifying or expanding upon a complex medical concept. Oliver Sacks The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, is a great book.

This book is a wonderful insight to the world of neurology, and the bizarre medical conditions of the patients/5(34). Dr. Sacks treats each of his subjects—the amnesic fifty-year-old man who believes himself to be a young sailor in the Navy, the “disembodied” woman whose limbs have become alien to her, and of course the famous man who mistook his wife for a hat—with a deep respect for .

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales is a book by neurologist Oliver Sacks describing the case histories of some of his patients.

Sacks chose the title of the book from the case study of one of his patients which he names "Dr. P" that has visual agnosia.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat - Wikipedia